/Gumbo, the Classic New Orleans Dish, Is Dead. Long Live Gumbo.

Gumbo, the Classic New Orleans Dish, Is Dead. Long Live Gumbo.


Levi Raines, the chef de delicacies at Bywater American Bistro, which opened final spring, developed an oyster gravy that’s primarily gumbo by one other title: a creamy purée of poached oysters and grated mirliton squash served over jasmine rice with fried jerk-spiced oysters. It is as shut as Ms. Compton, an proprietor, has come to associating herself with gumbo.

“It has the core elements of gumbo,” Ms. Compton mentioned of the oyster gravy, “but it’s presented in a way that people don’t normally see.”

At Turkey and the Wolf, a preferred sandwich store in the Irish Channel neighborhood, Mason Hereford cooks a gumbo that’s notable for holding elements that purists take into account heretical, together with tamarind paste, potato chips, Worcestershire sauce and, sometimes, leeks.

“I don’t recall anyone eating it and saying it’s gross,” Mr. Hereford mentioned. “But I have had people eat it and say, ‘This is not gumbo.’”

As comparable improvements mature into customary working procedures, fewer diners might query gumbos like Mr. Hereford’s. Another rising younger chef, Marcus Jacobs of Marjie’s Grill, considers the smoked rooster and Thai curry gumbo he serves as a vacation particular to be one in every of the extra standard objects on a menu largely impressed by journeys to Southeast Asia.

“People love it,” he mentioned. “It’s relatable.”

At Saffron Nola, Ashwin Vilkhu mentioned that restaurant has struck an analogous chord. “The most beautiful thing about this whole thing is, we’re changing people’s perceptions,” he mentioned.

Informed that curried gumbo was catching hearth in New Orleans, Ms. Chase was at first aghast. “I might by no means dream of placing curry in my gumbo,” she mentioned.



Source link Nytimes.com

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